Food Security Outlook

Households in the Dry Corridor will remain in Crisis until Primera harvests

February 2016

February - May 2016

Guatemala February 2016 Food Security Projections for February to May

June - September 2016

Guatemala February 2016 Food Security Projections for June to September

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Would likely be at least one phase worse without current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET classification is IPC-compatible. IPC-compatible analysis follows key IPC protocols but does not necessarily reflect the consensus of national food security partners.
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

IPC 2.0 Acute Food Insecurity Phase

Presence countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3: Crisis
4: Emergency
5: Famine
Remote monitoring
countries:
1: Minimal
2: Stressed
3+: Crisis or higher
Would likely be at least one phase worse without
current or programmed humanitarian assistance
FEWS NET Remote Monitoring countries use a colored outline to represent the highest IPC classification in areas of concern.

Key Messages

  • According to consensus forecast models, the current El Niño, which caused severe drought during the 2015 Primera season, will continue through the middle of the year. For July-September, the greatest probability is for neutral conditions. While a number of models indicate average to above-average cumulative rainfall for the 2016 Primera season, the transition from El Niño to neutral conditions elevates the risk of an irregular start to the rainy season, which could affect the early development of staple crops. 

  • The population of greatest concern for acute food insecurity are poor households in the temperate Western Highlands. In 2015, the poorest households in low-elevation areas were affected by the drought, limited employment opportunities, and below-average incomes. Higher levels of reported deaths from acute malnutrition were reported in these areas than in the east, particularly in coffee-growing areas. The worst-off households have presumably already spent close to a year in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and will continue to do so through at least September without long-term emergency assistance.

  • Very poor households in the east, particularly those with limited access to markets and jobs, will be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) due to near total crop losses in the Postrera growing season. However, certain municipalities in Chiquimula, Baja Verapaz, and Jutiapa will receive WFP assistance in the form of food and cash, which will help mitigate the effects of last year’s shocks. Food insecurity in these areas will remain at Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) levels. 

National Overview

Current situation

A severe drought during the 2015 Primera growing season, triggered by the ongoing El Niño conditions, caused a 75 to 100 percent reduction in crop production for the worst-off subsistence farming households, particularly in the western and eastern dry corridors. An uneven distribution of rainfall during the Postrera growing season also caused major damage to the crops of small-scale farmers. The households most affected by drought currently have no food reserves. For many households, the lean season beginning in the first quarter of 2015 is still ongoing. These households are currently entirely dependent on market purchases of maize, beansa, and other food. Households in other parts of the country had better harvests and will have food reserves through April, after which they will face the start of the lean season, when they are entirely reliant on food purchases after the depletion of household food stocks.

The first maize crops from the harvest in southern Petén and the Northern Transversal Strip are starting to be shipped to market, along with smaller quantities of crops from Izabal and the irrigation schemes in the east. Despite rainfall deficits in January, harvests should be near average. These grain crops are triggering a slight seasonal decline in prices by boosting domestic market supplies. Meanwhile, bean crops in southern Petén are progressing normally and should start arriving on markets in March, bringing down prices in line with normal seasonal trends. Staple grain crops are not being grown anywhere else in the country, until the start of the Primera season in April/May. The high-demand period for unskilled labor is over with the conclusion of the coffee and sugar cane harvest and the low demand for labor for other crops such as tobacco and melons.

The tightening of supplies with the conclusion of harvests for the Postrera growing season in altiplano areas drove up January prices for staple grain crops on domestic markets, in line with normal seasonal trends. However, this was followed by a seasonal decline in prices in mid-February with the influx of freshly harvested crops from surplus crop-producing areas, mainly in Petén and the Northern Transversal Strip. 

 

Assumptions

  • Climate and the El Niño phenomenon: According to the mid-February report by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), there is a 77 percent likelihood of El Niño conditions extending into the three-month period from April through June, followed by a transition to neutral conditions until at least the month of September.
  • Rainy season in the Northern region: According to the INSIVUMEH (the Seismology, Volcanology, Meteorology, and Hydrology Center), there will be normal to above-normal levels of cumulative rainfall in the country’s Northern region until March, due to the presence of cold fronts.
  • Staple grain production in the Northern region: The expected normal levels of rainfall in the Northern region, which includes southern Petén and the Northern Transversal Strip, should support an average to above-average bean harvest in March helping to ensure adequate domestic market supplies.
  • Beginning of the rainy season and canícula: Though international meteorological models are showing near-average levels of cumulative rainfall for the start of the Primera growing season in April/May, there is a high risk of an uneven distribution of rainfall in the Pacific basin. There is very little confidence in this forecast for average levels of cumulative rainfall due to the uncertain duration of the absence of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the eastern equatorial Pacific region. Forecasts of ambient temperatures are estimated at above-normal levels (by between one and two degrees Centigrade) through June. The weather service is currently predicting an average canícula (in July/August) in terms of its length and, while there is no information on its intensity, it could be more severe than usual with the transition from El Niño to neutral conditions. Rainfall activity should pick up in the second part of the rainy season, with the highest levels of cumulative rainfall on the southern coast.
  • Staple grain production for the Primera growing season: The uneven distribution of rainfall and above-normal temperatures at the beginning of the growing season for Primera crops could adversely affect crop planting activities and the initial stages of crop growth and development by drying out the soil. This will be a major issue in the Dry Corridor after the unusually dry conditions reported in that area in 2015.
  • Staple grain supplies and prices: There should be adequate staple grain supplies in all parts of the country from recent harvests of maize and, to a lesser extent, beans in surplus crop-producing areas of the North along with the steady influx of grain imports from Mexico. Thus, movements in staple grain prices will follow normal seasonal patterns. Maize prices are expected to edge upwards in March and stabilize between March and May with the shipments of grain to local markets. They will then move steadily upwards between May and August, until just before the country-wide harvests of Primera crops. Bean prices will decrease in March with the harvest in Petén and then rise steadily until August. However, prices for both crops will be higher than last year, especially in areas with households severly affected by the 2015 drought and completely dependent on market purchases. In the case of bean prices, they will be above the five-year average.
  • Sources of income: Demand for unskilled labor will be seasonally low during the entire outlook period with the conclusion of agroindustrial crop harvests for coffee, sugar cane, tobacco, melons, etc. There will be increasingly limited job opportunities for shorter-term employment in lower-paying jobs, mainly in ancillary activities for staple grain and African palm production and, to a lesser extent, in crop maintenance work for other crops. A major change in demand is unlikely anytime this year, and a growing supply of labor could create stronger competition for any existing job openings.  
  • Food assistance: There is still a pending delivery of food assistance by the government to households in the municipalities of Izabal, Zacapa, and Chiquimula from a food grant from the Brazilian government, supplemented by supplies procured through the World Food Program (WFP) with Guatemalan government funds. However, so far, no date has been set for its distribution. The WFP, in turn, is arranging for the delivery of assistance in the form of food and cash to 23,600 households in selected municipalities in Chiquimula, Baja Verapaz, and Jutiapa in the country’s eastern region between March and June 2016. With no provisions for the delivery of emergency food assistance to any other parts of the country during the outlook period, there could be a further deterioration in the food security situation of overlooked households.

Most likely food security outcomes

There will likely be a seasonal deterioration in the food security situation of the country’s poorest households during the outlook period, with dwindling income-generating opportunities curtailing food access at a time when households are dependent on food purchases. Food reserves from 2015 harvests are nearly depleted and are expected to run out sometime in or around March. In the eastern and western dry corridors, heavy crop losses have already left the worst-off households without any reserves. Thus, the market purchases will be the main source of food until the Primera harvest in August/September and until November in the case of altiplano areas. With limited sources of income during this period and the normal rise in prices weakening household purchasing power, household food security outcomes will deteriorate seasonally.

However, since this is the norm for this time of year and no major shocks are expected, there should be Minimal (IPC Phase 1) acute food insecurity in most parts of the country between February and September 2016. The two exceptions are households in the Dry Corridor, both in the east and in temperate western altiplano areas, and households dependent on the coffee sector, some of which were also affected by last year’s drought. These households have been facing an earlier-than-usual lean season for three consecutive years, including this year, due to the poor performance of their Primera crops, with some losing up to 100 percent of their crops in 2015. In areas with two growing seasons, the 2015 Postrera season was also affected by rainfall anomalies, with the worst-off farming households generally in lower-elevation areas losing more than 75 percent of their crops. Reported crop losses in the West, where there is not a second growing season, will affect food availability and household incomes until the next harvest season in altiplano areas between November 2016 and January 2017.

The coffee sector, which is one of the main sources of income for many households, has been affected by poor crop yields since the coffee rust outbreak in 2012 and by last year’s drought. Moreover, according to the ICO Composite Indicator, coffee prices fell by more than 30 percent between the beginning of last season and this season (between October 2014 and October 2015), reducing the incomes of small growers and the cash wages earned by day laborers. This loss of household income is weakening household purchasing power at a time when these households are depending on food purchases. However, their continued dependence on food purchases since the beginning of last year is further limiting their coping capacity. Scheduled deliveries of assistance (in the form of food and cash) to households in certain eastern areas of the country will keep food insecurity in targeted municipalities at Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) levels until September. However, the lack of any planned deliveries of food assistance in other areas to mitigate the impact of the situation described above will put them in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) for the entire outlook period. This will cause them to resort to more negative coping strategies (sales of productive assets, seed consumption, atypical patterns of migration, etc.) in order to meet their minimum food requirements. 

 

Areas of Concern

Small coffee growers and day laborers dependent on coffee in temperate areas of livelihood zone 5 (subsistence farming) [1]

Current situation

Status of staple grain crops: Households in this region have a single growing season for staple grain crops extending from April/May through December. However, the drought and the uneven distribution of rainfall during the seed development stage of the growing cycle of 2015 crops caused the poorest subsistence farming households to lose between 75 and 100 percent of their crops. This has left them without food reserves since February 2015 and will keep them completely dependent on food purchases. During FEWS NET’s visit to this area in January 2016, these households discussed how the last three poor crop years have left them without their usual maize and bean reserves. Despite their large losses, they were still able to salvage enough maize and bean seeds from their 2014 harvest to enable them to plant crops the following year. However, last year’s losses were so significant that most of the households interviewed indicated that they had no seeds whatsoever for this year’s growing season, which is about to begin in the next couple of months.

Staple grain prices: Average crop yields from the December harvest in surplus crop-producing areas of the Northern Transversal Strip and southern Petén and grain imports from Mexico have kept local markets supplied with crops. The bean harvests in the east and in altiplano areas unaffected by the drought supplied local markets with bean crops, stabilizing prices in December, which began increasing slightly in January in line with seasonal trends. According to price data from the Ministry of Agriculture, these supplies helped stabilize consumer prices for both white maize and black beans on departmental markets in the country’s Western region throughout the month. Monitoring data from the FAO showed prices for white maize down by 13.33 percent from the previous month and 5.10 percent above the five-year average.

Sources of income: The high-demand period for labor during the coffee harvest between October and February is one of the main sources of income generation for households in this area. While there was some improvement in the amount of available work in the coffee sector since the 2014/2015 harvest, it was still below “pre-rust” levels (2011/2012). The combined effects of the coffee rust outbreak, which is still not completely under control, and the drought conditions in the midst of the seed-filling state of crops during the 2015/2016 crop year, limited coffee production. While pay rates for day labor were unchanged at 35 to 45 GTQ per quintal of beans picked, the lighter weight of the beans forced day laborers to work harder to pick a quintal’s worth of beans. Small-scale coffee growers without the means to provide proper treatment for their coffee plants have suffered losses. This is the third consecutive year in which sales revenues from coffee have failed to cover production costs, requiring many farmers to resort to high-interest loans without knowing how or when they will be able to repay them. The price paid for parchment coffee is even lower than last year, at between 800 and 825 GTQ/quintal. These financial hardships prevented small growers from hiring day laborers for field clean-up and harvest work, which, in turn, limited income-earning opportunities for these workers. There was a stable, though limited, supply of work from activities with short production periods, such as the sugar cane harvest on the southern coast (between November and March/April) and market gardening and brick-laying activities.

Nutritional situation: According to data from the Ministry of Public Health by epidemiological week, the number of reported cases of acute malnutrition for 2015 has increased in the departments of Totonicapán, Sololá, Quiché, and Quetzaltenango by 19.9, 14.7, 10.5, and 7.8 percent, respectively. Although these regions have extremely high rates of chronic malnutrition and poor health service coverage could be impeding the detection of new cases, this data suggests that the acute food insecurity problems caused by the combined effects of the drought and the coffee rust outbreak are having an impact on the nutritional status of children under the age of five. In addition, approximately 30 percent of all confirmed cases of deaths from acute malnutrition nationwide were reported in the western part of the country. Huehuetenango department has the highest mortality rate and municipalities in coffee-growing areas account for 20 percent of deaths in this region. However, there is not a high rate of mortality by international standards.

Food assistance: There are no ongoing or scheduled emergency assistance programs for the next eight months.

Food consumption and livelihoods: Data collected during the recent field visit by FEWS NET showed increased migration to nearby departmental capitals, Guatemala City, and the United States, particularly by youths looking for ways to earn extra household income, who do not normally engage in labor migration. There have also been shifts from farming-based livelihoods to wage labor in domestic service, construction, security jobs, informal trade, or other occupations not requiring any specialized preparation. Households are choosing less expensive foods, such as Mexican maize, over culturally preferred foods such as local maize. The loss of poultry to preventable diseases due to a lack of funds has dramatically reduced the consumption of eggs and/or chicken meat.

Assumptions

The outlook for this region is based on the following assumptions in addition to the nationwide assumptions outlined earlier in the report:

  • The steady increase in the flow of remittances over the past few months will continue. While this will not directly affect the poorest households, it will help sustain a near-average level of demand for labor in brick-laying activities serving as a source of employment.
  • Rainfall anomalies will affect the development of maize and bean crops generally grown as companion crops and promote the proliferation of crop pests and diseases, which could potentially lead to a below-average harvest for 2016.
  • Reduced incomes from the sale of coffee and loan repayment obligations will prevent small planters from being able to make food purchases in the coming months without resorting to coping strategies such as atypical internal and international migration.
  • Native seeds losses and lower incomes from day labor in coffee-growing activities will prevent approximately 30 percent of households from being able to plant either maize or bean crops. This will also affect the hiring of small crews of day laborers for land preparation and crop planting work.

Most likely food security outcomes

The lean season is already underway in livelihood zone 5, where income generation is curtailed by the limited income-earning opportunities and lower rates of pay for day labor. The already weakened household purchasing power in this area is being further diminished by the seasonal rises in prices at this time of year. The expected sharp price increases this year will severely affect the food access of very poor households lacking the necessary resilience to withstand these successive shocks and force them to turn back to unsustainable or negative coping strategies in order to get enough to eat. However, even these strategies will not suffice to meet their basic food and nonfood needs. Some households have already begun to shift from farming-based livelihoods to informal employment. With no scheduled emergency food assistance programs for this area and no staple grain harvests until November/December, households affected by the drought and the coffee rust outbreak will be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) for the entire outlook period.

Rises in acute malnutrition rates are expected to outstrip normal seasonal trends during the outlook period and there will continue to be higher numbers of deaths from malnutrition than in other areas of the country, although the number will not exceed the emergency threshold.

Coffee-dependent day laborers in livelihood zones 8 (Basic grains, Honduras-El Salvador border area of the Dry Corridor) and 7 (Agro-industry, timber, mining, and coffee) [2]

Current situation

Status of crops: Subsistence farming households severely affected by the drought and rainfall anomalies lost 75 to 100 percent of their staple grain crops for the 2015 Primera and Postrera growing seasons. As a result, they currently have no maize or bean reserves and are dependent on food purchases. However, some households are choosing not to buy beans for personal consumption, using what little cash they have to purchase maize instead which gives them a better return and is the mainstay of their diet. The annual lean season is already underway, having kicked off earlier than usual. During the field visit by FEWS NET in January 2016, a number of respondents indicated that their households had reduced the amount of grain they were purchasing and were buying maize and beans by the pound for immediate consumption rather than by the quintal, as they normally do, for lack of cash with which to make these larger purchases.

Staple grain prices: Households interviewed in this region in January reported inter-monthly rises in consumer prices for beans ranging from 25 to 40 percent to as much as 265 percent. Price monitoring data from the Ministry of Agriculture for the departmental market in Chiquimula shows a rise of 18 percent from December and 30.9 percent from January 2015, the largest price increases in the region. Households reported rises of 50 to 87 percent in the price of maize from the previous month, while the Ministry reported prices up by 12 percent from December 2014 and 16.7 percent above the five-year average. According to price monitoring data for January from the FAO, producer prices for beans were up by 21.4 percent from the previous year, while maize prices were up by 25 percent from the previous year and 19 percent above the five-year average. Given the average harvest of Postrera crops in surplus crop-producing areas, these price increases are being driven by an atypically high demand from households affected by crop losses resorting to food purchases at a time when they are normally still exhausting their reserves of home-grown crops.

Sources of income: The annual high-demand period for unskilled labor began in October with the coffee harvest and, to a lesser extent, harvests of locally grown melons, tobacco, staple grain crops in Petén, and sugar cane crops on the southern coast. However, with the continuing rust outbreak and the rainfall deficits and anomalies during a large part of the 2015 rainy season, the farmers interviewed in this area reported reductions of up to 88 percent in the size of coffee harvests in certain locations, with lighter coffee beans. These lighter beans, reduced the wages earned by day laborers paid based on their weight. At the height of the harvest, laborers were getting 30 GTQ/quintal plus food (3-3.5 cans) and 35 GTQ/quintal without food. The conclusion of the harvest sharply reduced the supply of jobs and pay rates, cutting them nearly in half. Moreover, producer prices have been cut by 40 to 60 percent, which puts them below production costs.

Although irrigated melon production is unaffected, income-earning opportunities for area households in these activities are still expected to be limited due to the competition for available jobs with the growing demand from households outside the area.

Food assistance: The WFP is planning to deliver food and cash assistance to 23,600 households in selected municipalities of Chiquimula, Baja Verapaz, and Jutiapa between March and September. In addition, the government still has a pending delivery of assistance to households in Chiquimula and Zacapa departments (from a food grant from the Brazilian government, supplemented by supplies procured by the WFP with Guatemalan government funds). However, the timing of its distribution is still uncertain and depends on the hiring of extension workers by the new administration, though distributions are expected within the next three months. There are no plans for the delivery of food assistance to any of the other departments in this area.

Nutritional situation: According to data from the Ministry of Public Health, the number of reported cases of acute malnutrition in 2015 increased in the departments of El Progreso and Chiquimula by 26.7 and 7.0 percent, respectively. Although poor health service coverage could be impeding the detection of new cases, this data suggests that the acute food insecurity problems caused by the combined effects of the drought and the coffee rust outbreak are having an impact on the nutritional status of children under the age of five. Chiquimula department in particular is among the five health areas with the highest rates of moderate and severe acute malnutrition and accounts for five percent of all confirmed cases of deaths from acute malnutrition in 2015.

Food consumption and livelihoods: Households in this region are reporting a reduction in their dietary diversity, even in their consumption of staple foods such as beans. In many cases, household diets are reportedly limited to salted tortillas. There are reports of atypical rural-urban migration, even by women, who do not normally engage in migration. Area households have had to reduce their basic nonfood spending in areas such as health and education.

Water availability: Water sources are running low and in many cases this is affecting the water access of the local population, either by making it necessary to haul water from more distant locations or through the rationing of piped residential water supplies.

Assumptions

The outlook for this region is based on the following assumptions in addition to the nationwide assumptions outlined earlier in the report:

  • With total crop losses in 2015, many subsistence farmers have no native seeds with which to plant this year’s crops and, will have to resort to purchasing seeds. Lacking sufficient means to purchases large amounts of seed, these farmers will have to plant smaller fields.
  • Yields from Primera crops are expected to be below average due to the projected rainfall anomalies in the early part of the growing season and lack of sufficient soil moisture. These conditions are also conducive to outbreaks of crop pests and diseases.
  • The dry conditions will initially limit the spread of the rust fungus on coffee plantations, but they will also adversely affect the development of coffee plants and cherries. In addition, the low selling price of coffee will operate as a disincentive to the proper maintenance of coffee plantations by small growers, which would trigger a new surge in the rust outbreak in the second half of the year with the pick-up in rainfall activity.

Most likely food security outcomes

Very poor households in livelihood zones 7 and 8 are already in the midst of the annual lean season, which got underway two to three months earlier than usual. After their heavy losses in 2015, these households have no staple grain reserves at a time when they normally go from purchasing grain to consuming home-grown crops as their source of food. In addition, there is a sharp seasonal decline in income-generating opportunities, and staple grain prices are beginning to rise with the gradual tightening of market supplies. Some households will have the opportunity to seek out other employment options through rural-urban migration in the first half of the outlook period (the four-month period from February through May). However, the majority do not have the support and social connections needed to change their livelihoods and will be forced to continue to rely on the few available short-term employment opportunities for day labor and the few remaining negative coping strategies.. Their food consumption will continue to be reduced, with their diet limited to tortillas and salt and possibly a few herbs or wild fruits. Thus, they will not meet their energy and nutritional requirements and the poorest households will likely be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). Households receiving outside assistance from the WFP are an exception, which will keep them in the Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) phase of food insecurity for as long as assistance lasts.

There will be a further deterioration in conditions in the second half of the outlook period (the four-month period from June through September) compared with the situation in the previous four months for the duration of the lean season, which normally reaches its peak in the month of August, just before the harvest of Primera crops. However, there will be very little change in food intake through the month of August with the upcoming harvest of Primera crops in September, which will help improve food availability, though they are expected to be smaller than average. As was the case in the previous period, with the exception of a few households able to find other employment in urban areas, most households will be forced to continue to rely on the few available short-term employment opportunities for day labor. The poorest households in this area will be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) through August until the harvest of Primera crops, at which point conditions will temporarily improve to Stressed (IPC Phase 2). Households in municipalities served by WFP assistance programs will be classified as Stressed (IPC Phase 2!) through August and will experience Minimal (IPC Phase 1!) food insecurity in September with the food supplies from Primera crops and the last delivery of food assistance.

Rises in acute malnutrition rates are expected to increase beyond normal seasonal trends during the outlook period. However, mortality rates from malnutrition should not exceed the emergency threshold.

 

[1] See the 2007 Livelihood Profile (available in Spanish only) at: http://www.fews.net/docs/Publications/gt_profile_es.pdf.

[2] See the 2007 Livelihood Profile (available in Spanish only) at: http://www.fews.net/docs/Publications/gt_profile_es.pdf

Events that Could Change the Outlook

Area

Event

Impact on food security outcomes

National

Evenly distributed average levels of cumulative rainfall

Primera crops will be planted on schedule and crop yields for the growing season will be average. This will improve food availability at harvest time for households in the east between August and September.

East and West

Delivery of seeds to poor households affected by crop losses in 2015

Households would be able to plant staple grain crops for the Primera growing season, increasing the likelihood of an improvement in food availability by September in the east and in December in the west.

 

East and West

Delivery of food assistance for uncovered months and overlooked municipalities

Improvement in food availability for recipient households, positively affecting food security outcomes

East and West

Unusually severe and/or protracted canícula

This would adversely affect the growth and development of Primera crops, particularly in the Dry Corridor, since it would coincide with a stage of the growing cycle in which crops need better water availability for seed production.

About Scenario Development

To project food security outcomes, FEWS NET develops a set of assumptions about likely events, their effects, and the probable responses of various actors. FEWS NET analyzes these assumptions in the context of current conditions and local livelihoods to arrive at a most likely scenario for the coming eight months. Learn more here.

About FEWS NET

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network is a leading provider of early warning and analysis on food insecurity. Created by USAID in 1985 to help decision-makers plan for humanitarian crises, FEWS NET provides evidence-based analysis on some 34 countries. Implementing team members include NASA, NOAA, USDA, and USGS, along with Chemonics International Inc. and Kimetrica. Read more about our work.

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